Here is a book that just came to my attention, A Pattern Language by Christopher Alexander. Since my first introduction to architecture and human design in art school, building buildings to reflect a healthy lifestyle has been one of my core interests. Why not use our creativity to design buildings that enhance our energy and make our lives better?

Here is a reader review:

it isn’t about architecture, April 29, 2000
By Philip Greenspun (Cambridge, MA USA) – See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)
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This review is from: A Pattern Language: Towns, Buildings, Construction (Center for Environmental Structure Series) (Hardcover)
Nominally about architecture and urban planning, this book has more wisdom about psychology, anthropology, and sociology than any other that I’ve read. Nearly every one of this volume’s 1170 pages will make you question an assumption that you probably didn’t realize you were making. In a section entitled “Four-Story Limit”, Alexander notes that “there is abundant evidence to show that high buildings make people crazy…”

… Many of Alexander’s arguments are against the scale of modern systems. Public schools spend a fortune on building and administration precisely because they are so physically large [I’ve seen statistics showing that our cities spend only about one-third of their budgets on classrooms and teachers]. If we had shopfront schools and fired all the school system personnel who don’t teach, we might be able to get student-teacher ratios down to 8 or 10:1 without an increase in cost. Similarly, Alexander argues for smaller retail shops, smaller factories (or at least identifiable small workgroups within factories rather than hundreds of faceless cogs) and more master/apprentice instruction.

What if you like the depredations of modernity and aren’t interested in a utopian world where basic human needs are met? Can you learn anything about architecture from this guy? Absolutely. You’ll learn that light is everything. Your bedroom has to have eastern light so that the sun wakes you up. Your best living quarters should have southern light. All the rooms should have light from at least two sides, otherwise there will be too much contrast and you’ll just have to draw the shades. If you’ve got kids, make them sleep and play in their own wing of the house. Build a realm for yourself and your wife on a different floor. Meet the kids in the kitchen.

To avoid cluttering my apartment, I give away virtually all the books that I buy these days. I’m keeping this one and plan to re-read it every year.

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